Model Home Plan

Model Home Plan

A model home plan suitable for a physician.

Craftsman Style

¶ One of the simplest of all forms - the parallelogram - furnishes the basis of this design for a model home for a doctor. But little beauty ordinarily exists in a structure erected on this plan; yet the hands of a skillful designer may do much toward redeeming it from the repulsive baldness which is too frequently exhibited even in the better class of country houses. If the design before us were divested of its verandas and dormers, and a plain hip-roof substituted for the curved Mansard, with the exception in its favor of chimney tops and window blinds, it would puzzle the amateur to decide whether it should be called a human habitation or a diminutive cotton factory. But the features above named effectually redeem it from the imputation of leaving the passing traveler in doubt as to its true purpose.

Model Home Plan
Model Home Plan

¶ This residence has been erected and is now occupied by Dr. E. C. Evans, in the vicinity of West Chester, Penn. The plans and elevation were prepared by us under his eye, and in accordance with directions and suggestions which he offered during the course of their preparation. Since its building, he has expressed his satisfaction in decided terms with the result of our combined efforts. Our readers will permit us to add, that Dr. Evans is a gentleman of close observation and acknowledged intelligence, and winle many may dispute his taste, but few can find fault with his judgment: an investigation of the plan of his home will go far to sustain us in the latter allegation.

Rooms

¶ The front entrance is effected through the end veranda H, picture 44, into the hall A, 12 by 21 feet, which, besides containing the spiral staircase, is ample enough for a small company to resort to for conversation in the pleasant days of summer: being provided with a fireplace, it would be an excellent place at any season for the entertainment of such visitors as are too unscrupulous with regard to the state of their boots to be admitted to the parlor. So much for the hall. On the left, as we enter, we observe B, 17 by 15 feet, one of the cosiest little parlors that you can well imagine; just the right size to entertain all your country acquaintances in, that might feel slighted by being invited to the dining room.

Blueprints
Blueprints

¶ This room, designated by the letter C, is 15 by 20 feet. Beyond is a snug little bedroom D, 12 feet square: this would perhaps be the best room for an office; change the window next the veranda, H, to a door, and we have at once an entrance for the admission of such patients as might prefer coming to see the "doctor" instead of his visiting them. A possible, but less convenient location for an office would be on the second floor, over the hall; a serious objection to this, however, would be the abuse of the principal stairs, and especially the stair carpets. The kitchen E is 15 by 12 feet, and entered from the front hall or the dining room at pleasure, and has a back door, as every kitchen ought to have; but, by a little inattention, no steps have been provided for it, much less any shelter which might assume the several forms of piazza, summer kitchen or wood shed. F and G are pantries, adjacent to which is a flight of private stairs.

¶ On the second floor, picture 45, we find five bedrooms provided with closets; from the passage P, we ascend to the attic floor. We must, however, not neglect the bathrooms, L and M; the former containing a water closet, well ventilated by a flue connecting with the range flue from the kitchen. On the attic plan, fig 46, in which the perpendicular dimensions of the rooms are obtained entirely in the height of the roog and the light received from the dormer windows, the bedrooms are represented by R, S being the hall, T the trunk room, and U closets.

Attic Plans
Attic Plans

Construction

¶ This design is intended to be built of brick, and rough-cast, and the roof overlaid with shingles. A little ornamentation bestowed on the exposed ends of these would be in perfect keeping with the style of the building. The verandas should be of oak, and stained a little so as to resemble old oak; similar treatment might be bestowed on all the exposed woodwork with very good effect, - of course observing that the external surface of the wall should be colored to harmonize with it.

¶ The window heads and chimney caps may be dressed stone. The interior should be finished up in a style of perfect harmony with the exterior, substantial but not ornate. The proprietor may exert his taste in the selection of paper for the walls; the balance of the decoration must be left to the plasterer and painter, - observing carefully, however, that no very rich ornaments or striking contrasts of color are to be permitted.

Cost

¶ The estimate for this design, in the neighborhood of West Chester, was $3000 (1861 prices); but we think it was probably built for a little less under the careful management of the proprietor.

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